MOOD
DISORDERS

DEFINED

Although mood disorders are often misinterpreted as merely mood swings, they are actually treatable medical illnesses caused by a variety of biological and environmental factors.

A mood disorder can feel like there’s no control. Whether it’s a cloud of depression or racing, disjointed thoughts, they can be difficult to recognize–and even harder to talk about.

COMMON TYPES

depression

is characterized by tiredness, a loss of interest in activities that were once enjoyable, and feelings for other people, with a general decline in contentment and mood.

mania

is characterized by a state of heightened overall activity, such as increased energy and speed of thinking.

bipolar

is characterized by mild to extreme shifts between depression and mania, resulting in erratic and/or unpredictable changes in behavior.

Today 5:16PM

Who? Someone you know.

1 in 10 young people experience a period of major depression.

SOUND LIKE SOMEONE YOU KNOW?
THEY MIGHT WANT TO TALK ABOUT IT.

HOW DO I
BRING IT UP?

We know that you’re not a doctor. In fact, you’re something better: a friend. That’s why you should skip trying to diagnose anyone and simply be there for someone in need–it’s actually easier than you might think.

For starters:

remember your I's image

REMEMBER YOUR "I"S

As in “I care about you” or “I’m worried about you”. Making sure to speak on your own behalf can lower the shields and make for a more productive, thoughtful dialogue.

Specificity Is Key

SPECIFICITY IS KEY

Try to share examples of times you felt concerned, as opposed to broad, sweeping generalizations.

Point To A Pro

POINT TO A PRO

Encourage them to seek professional help and offer your support. For instance, accompanying someone to an appointment can make the experience much more manageable.

5:19PM

1 in 25 Americans lives with a serious mental illness, such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, or major depression.

Of course, any conversation at all is a great first step.

you could talk about:

smart watches

what else?

THINGS TO AVOID

While you’re whatever-ing it up, a couple things
to steer clear of include:

COMPARING NOTES

While you may be able to relate some of your experiences to what your friend is feeling, they’re not the same and could cause more confusion than clarity.

PRESSURE POINTS

Oftentimes there are certain sensitivities that can cause a mood issue to shift with a person suffering from a mood disorder. If you are aware of any of your friend’s triggers, make sure to avoid or remove them before the conversation.

THE 'OL BRUSH OFF

Saying things like, “But it’s all in your head” or “Everyone has bad days” can minimize a lifelong struggle, making recovery seem simple and obvious, or obscure the fact that the issue is real. You need to show that you understand where they are coming from and that they can trust you.

OUR
CAMPAIGN

ERIC

MELISSA

5:19PM

Mental illness typically strikes young people in their most productive years, 16-25.

RESOURCES

KNOWLEDGE = POWER

For those in search of a deeper dive,
we’ve got you covered:

MentalHealth.gov UCLA Health Anxiety and Depression Association of America (ADAA) Depression.org CAST Centers

FIND A LOCAL PROFESSIONAL

Ultimately, someone dealing with a mood disorder might want to seek professional treatment, whether medical, nutritional, or therapeutic. Look up local professionals in your area:

search

or

use my current location

Remember, it’s important not to diagnose yourself or someone else
with any kind of health issue if you’re not a qualified
health professional. Those resources are available above.