EATING
DISORDERS

DEFINED

An eating disorder is an unhealthy obsession with food and weight. People with eating disorders eat-or-avoid eating in extreme ways.

An eating disorder can mean that someone feels physically flawed or otherwise inferior. This perception, compacted by social stigmas and isolating behaviors, often leaves those suffering feeling desperate and alone.

COMMON TYPES

anorexia

is characterized by an abnormally low body weight, intense fear of gaining weight and a distorted perception of body weight.

bulimia

is characterized by periods of extreme overeating, followed by depression and self-induced vomiting, purging, or fasting.

binge eating

is characterized by recurring episodes of eating large quantities of food, often very quickly and to the point of discomfort.

Today 5:16PM

Who? Someone you know.

At least 30 million Americans suffer from an eating disorder in their lifetime.

SOUND LIKE SOMEONE YOU KNOW?
THEY MIGHT WANT TO TALK ABOUT IT.

HOW DO I
BRING IT UP?

We know that you’re not a doctor. In fact, you’re something better: a friend. That’s why you should skip trying to diagnose anyone and simply be there for someone in need–it’s actually easier than you might think.

For starters:

remember your I's image

REMEMBER YOUR "I"S

As in “I care about you” or “I’m worried about you”. Making sure to speak on your own behalf can lower the shields and make for a more productive, thoughtful dialogue.

Specificity Is Key

SPECIFICITY IS KEY

Try to share examples of times you felt concerned, as opposed to broad, sweeping generalizations.

Point To A Pro

POINT TO A PRO

Encourage them to seek professional help and offer your support. For instance, accompanying someone to an appointment can make the experience much more manageable.

5:19PM

69% of girls ages 10 to 18 confirm that photographs of models and celebrities inspired their desired body shape.

Of course, any conversation at all is a great first step.

you could talk about:

lighthouse workers

what else?

THINGS TO AVOID

While you’re whatever-ing it up, a couple things
to steer clear of include:

BODYTALK

Saying things like, “But, you’re not fat!” or “You look great!” while nice, are not helpful to hear. You may think it’s a compliment, but to the person suffering it could be a negative trigger that encourages their behavior.

FOODSTUFF

It’s easy to judge someone for what’s on their plate, but it can make the sufferer feel awkward or ashamed, and less likely to open up to you.

“NBD”-ING

If someone is binge eating, or adhering to a severe diet, saying things like, “I do that too sometimes” may provide a false sense of comfort or normalcy around their behavior.

OUR
CAMPAIGN

STEPH

BRIAN

5:19PM

Contrary to stereotypes, 1 in 3 people who suffer from some kind of eating disorder are men.

RESOURCES

FIND A LOCAL PROFESSIONAL

Ultimately, someone dealing with a eating disorder might want to seek professional treatment, whether medical, nutritional, or therapeutic. Look up local professionals in your area:

search

or

use my current location

Remember, it’s important not to diagnose yourself or someone else
with any kind of health issue if you’re not a qualified
health professional. Those resources are available above.